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What's New

New brief: Building Stronger Networks

  • May 28, 2019

This brief, Building Stronger Networks (May 2019), explores how a framework recognizing adverse childhood experiences, trauma, and resilience (ATR) can facilitate and accelerate community collaboration.  It builds on existing literature regarding common collaboration challenges and draws from a series of key informant interviews conducted by Andrea K. Blanch, Ph.D., and David L. Shern, Ph.D. 


Supporting Older Trauma Survivors as They Heal Their Pasts, Grow Their Futures

  • May 20, 2019
By:
Anndee Hochman

Marie-Monique Marthol handed out the cards to older adults at meetings of her local civic association. With the pastor’s permission, she left some at a neighborhood church. She stacked them in restaurants, community centers and even at the laundromat.

On the front, the cards read, “Time never runs out for change. Let go of fear and guilt. Focus on healing and growth from ACEs.” The flip side said, “Healing from your past; giving to your future.”


From Film Festival to City Council Chambers: Philadelphia ACE Task Force Charts a Path toward Policy Change on Secondary Traumatic Stress

  • Mar 29, 2019
By:
Anndee Hochman

The path toward policies that would buffer Philadelphia workers from secondary traumatic stress began with a simple ask: Come see a movie.

That movie was a documentary, Portraits of Professional CAREgivers: Their Passion, Their Pain, viewed by an audience of 250 as part of a 2016 film festival hosted by the Philadelphia ACE Task Force (PATF).

The screening launched a three-year effort to put secondary traumatic stress on the radar of Philadelphia’s policy-makers—a journey of relationships and resolutions, work groups and literature reviews, persistence and patience.

In December 2018, the issue landed in City Council’s ornate chambers: a hearing that included testimony from physicians, officers of city agencies, behavioral health experts, a union president and representatives from the police and fire departments.


Investing in Cross-Sector Networks to Build a Trauma-Informed Region

  • Jan 15, 2019
By:
Anndee Hochman

When Suzanne O’Connor first joined the Philadelphia ACE Task Force (PATF)—a group then composed mostly of pediatricians who wanted to put ACE science into practice—she did more listening than talking.

“I wasn’t a doctor, I wasn’t a clinician, but a teacher trying to integrate trauma-informed care into early childhood education,” she says. “What struck me the most was what educators didn’t know about social services, mental health and even physical health. We didn’t have language for what we were seeing with kids who were particularly challenging.”

ACEs gave O’Connor that language. She became a passionate advocate for trauma training for early childhood and K-12 teachers. Now, as director of education for United Way of Greater Philadelphia and Southern New Jersey, O’Connor is helping trauma-informed practice to ripple across the region.


MARC at American Public Health Association's 2018 Annual Meeting

  • Dec 01, 2018

On November 13, 2018 MARC’s Clare Reidy co-presented with Howard Pinderhughes from the University of California-San Francisco at the American Public Health Association’s 2018 Annual Meeting & Expo in San Diego, California.  Reidy and Pinderhughes focused on health equity and positive early childhood development, with an emphasis on healing and preventing community trauma.  
 


On the Path to Health Equity: When Foundations and Corporations Support Trauma-Informed, Cross-Sector Networks

  • Nov 29, 2018
By:
Anndee Hochman

Ann Marie Healy used to travel around Pennsylvania talking to community members about “smart” land use planning. Through her work with 10,000 Friends of Pennsylvania, a non-profit devoted to revitalizing cities and towns, “we would meet with people to share what we had learned about how to approach planning in a more strategic manner.” In one small town, residents questioned the relevance of the pitch. “Isn’t what we’ve learned locally just as important as what experts have found works elsewhere?” they asked.  The experience taught Healy that expertise and local ingenuity are not mutually exclusive and that language matters.


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